Book Review: Lamb by Christopher Moore


This disclaimer applies here, too.

I love me some Chris Moore. Of course, with titles like Practical Demonkeeping and The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove, how could you not?

Anyway, I've just finished Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal. This goes back to that perspective thing I was on about last week.

Raziel, the barely competent, perpetually late angel (in Moore's telling, he shows himself to Jesus – Joshua, actually, because that's what the name translates to from the Hebrew – and Biff at 10 years old, when he was supposed to show up at Joshua's birth), is told to raise Biff from the dust right about the year 2000, give him the gift of tongues (so he can write in modern English) and charge him with writing a new gospel, since no one else seems to have included much about Jesus from, oh, birth until his 30s.

So, Biff details the journeys he took with Joshua to visit those three wise men who had come to visit Josh upon his birth. They learn kung fu, they learn meditation (Joshua's so good at it he actually manages to disappear). They free children from sacrifice in India, they learn magic, and Biff has a lot of sex.

The new gospel is interwoven with stories about Raziel's love of soap operas and professional wrestling, Biff's enjoyment of pizza, and it's topped off with a sappy love story ending.

Moore is more reverent with this subject matter than usual (for obvious reasons), and it's clear he was going long (the book comes in at 444 pages, including an afterword that you should read), because when Josh and Biff return to Judea for Josh's ministry, the modern-day Biff and Raziel are absent until the epilogue.

Features: Mary Magdalene is a very strong, positive character. The whole water-to-wine thing is done to spice up a boring wedding. We get the origin of certain stories and quotes that have been attributed to Jesus.

In all, a funny book. More or less typical Moore, but with some pretty serious subject matter. If you're the sort of person who can't handle your faith being ridiculed or your messiah being a drunk, horny teenager, don't read it. Otherwise, do.

Book Review: Lamb by Christopher Moore


This disclaimer applies here, too.

I love me some Chris Moore. Of course, with titles like Practical Demonkeeping and The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove, how could you not?

Anyway, I've just finished Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal. This goes back to that perspective thing I was on about last week.

Raziel, the barely competent, perpetually late angel (in Moore's telling, he shows himself to Jesus – Joshua, actually, because that's what the name translates to from the Hebrew – and Biff at 10 years old, when he was supposed to show up at Joshua's birth), is told to raise Biff from the dust right about the year 2000, give him the gift of tongues (so he can write in modern English) and charge him with writing a new gospel, since no one else seems to have included much about Jesus from, oh, birth until his 30s.

So, Biff details the journeys he took with Joshua to visit those three wise men who had come to visit Josh upon his birth. They learn kung fu, they learn meditation (Joshua's so good at it he actually manages to disappear). They free children from sacrifice in India, they learn magic, and Biff has a lot of sex.

The new gospel is interwoven with stories about Raziel's love of soap operas and professional wrestling, Biff's enjoyment of pizza, and it's topped off with a sappy love story ending.

Moore is more reverent with this subject matter than usual (for obvious reasons), and it's clear he was going long (the book comes in at 444 pages, including an afterword that you should read), because when Josh and Biff return to Judea for Josh's ministry, the modern-day Biff and Raziel are absent until the epilogue.

Features: Mary Magdalene is a very strong, positive character. The whole water-to-wine thing is done to spice up a boring wedding. We get the origin of certain stories and quotes that have been attributed to Jesus.

In all, a funny book. More or less typical Moore, but with some pretty serious subject matter. If you're the sort of person who can't handle your faith being ridiculed or your messiah being a drunk, horny teenager, don't read it. Otherwise, do.