David Bowie and Charles M. Shulz: Life’s work and legacy


"Look up here, I'm in heaven I've got scars that can't be seen / I've got drama, can't be stolen / Everybody knows me now" — David Bowie, "Lazarus"

David Bowie died Sunday, two days after turning 69 and releasing a new album, which includes the song "Lazarus." The track is a farewell. Bowie was fighting cancer and knew he was making his last record. The Telegraph did a nice piece on it.

I'm not going to post a bio or history. If you don't know who Bowie is, go do some Googling. Listen to some music. Watch some movies. His career was long and varied. It was also very creative and very intentional. He almost passed up working with Bing Crosby because he didn't think "Little Drummer Boy" was the right song for him. So, he and Crosby did the now-famous "Peace on Earth/Little Drummer Boy" a month before Crosby died.

Bowie was able to do something a lot of us should aspire to: go out having said a recent goodbye, his legacy speaking for itself.

It calls to mind the death of "Peanuts" creator Charles M. Schulz, who died hours before the final comic appeared in papers.

My friend Matt, who is both a musician and cancer survivor, has an interesting take on mourning musicians we've never met, and on Bowie's death, specifically.

You know, admittedly I sometimes feel a little silly to feel so personally affected when a famous artist or musician...

Posted by Matthew Larsen on Monday, January 11, 2016

In addition to firming up their legacy right up to the time of their deaths, both Bowie and Shulz worked their respective crafts right up until the end of their lives. We should all be so lucky.

I think my friend Seth says best how you can honor Bowie. He wanted this work out in the world, and it's out. Listen to it.

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