Gentrifying religion: Bringing the high thinkers together


Start this around 27 minutes.

Alex and Allyson Grey visited Joe Rogan last month.

The Greys are the founders of the Church of Sacred Mirrors, a church (yes, with IRS certification and everything) centered around sacred art and that sort of thing.

They have a discussion with Rogan starting around 27 minutes into the podcast (you can just start there on the video above) about what is essentially getting the riffraff out of religion.

Rogan argues that “most people” think religion is outdated, based on myths and incorporating traditions that are highly outmoded. Objectively, he’s incorrect — some 84 percent of the world’s population identifies as being affiliated with a religion.

The Greys assert that religion is still important. It doesn’t matter what you describe as God, but it’s humans that give some religions a bad name. I’ll just mention Catholic Church sex scandal and Islamic terrorism and let you deal with whatever happens in your brain.

Artists move into poor, often crime-ridden neighborhoods. They do this because, especially as artists attempting to get established, these are the places they can afford to live. Being full of creativity but lacking in some of the things they need, the artists open cafes where they can discuss art, galleries where they can show art, markets where they can buy food and somewhere to go for eggs and toast after a long evening at the easel.

As these places open, people with more means move in to enjoy the new community, and as time goes on, the artists are sometimes forced out because the neighborhood has become unaffordable, and they move to new communities and the cycle begins somewhere else.

This process is called gentrification, and often carries a pejorative connotation. But maybe organized faith can use some spiritual gentrification. It’s worth a discussion, I think.

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