Josh: The Podcast, Episode 64: Health care, jury duty and the American Prohibition Museum

We discuss why the health care bill should include as much coverage as possible (hint: not a right, not an entitlement); how to make improvements to the jury duty experience; and a new Savannah spot, the American Prohibition Museum.

Show our sponsors some love:
Get a free month with a subscription to BarkBox at GetBarkBox.com/josh
Get 30% off your purchase of a domain, hosting and other website services at TryGoDaddy.com/josh

Links:
Josh on the Cesspool podcast
Jeff Sass on Josh: The Podcast
American Prohibition Museum
Thoughts on Abundance | Get the book
Chatham County jury duty FAQ
Declaring independence — Josh reads the Declaration of Independence

Subscribe
iTunes
Player.fm
Google Play
Stitcher
Libsyn (RSS)

See more episodes on the podcasts page.

Support the podcast:
Get a free month when you subscribe to Barkbox
Get 30% off when you register your domain at GoDaddy
Get a free audiobook and a free month at Audible
Shop at Amazon

Lessons from Everlast and Joe Rogan, with some Teddy Roosevelt tossed in

Two drunk/stoned friends after a podcast. @ogeverlast

A post shared by Joe Rogan (@joerogan) on

Everlast was back on Joe Rogan's podcast recently. It was another one of those podcasts that I expected to enjoy but instead learned a lot (see my notes from Bert Kreischer talking to Robert Kelly).

Everlast is a musician and rapper; if you're my age, you know him from House of Pain. Need a reminder? Have an earworm. He's been dead on the operating table twice. He has an artificial heart valve. He has a daughter with cystic fibrosis. He recently watched his mother slide downhill with Alzheimer's and then pass away.

Fame doesn't make you immune to the problems of the rest of us, is what I'm saying.

The followng video appears during the podcast. It's a better 2-minute clip to start things. The full podcast is at the bottom of the post.

There's some drunk babble. It kind of runs off the rails at the end. But there's a lot in here. You don't need to listen, but if these snippets move you, maybe at least hit play on that video at the bottom and give them a play.

• Be open to learning something new
• Culture is like an operating system; we gain perspective by loading new operating systems (visiting different cultures)
• Half-truths are turning people against each other
• Americans right now are part of the biggest reality TV show ever
• If you want to be a leader, you must let go of ego
• Sometimes you have to call out the bullshit
• It's easy to pick a team and then fight for it. It's more difficult — but more important — to find common ground
• Think for yourself
• Take a step back
Love
• Be compassionate. Sometimes people need to feel whatever it is they're feeling
• There are injustices in the world
• Anger doesn't serve you
• Sometimes there's a glitch in the matrix and you just have to deal with it
• Your life is normal
• Some people fight battles you'll never see
• "Compassion is the thief of joy" —Theodore Roosevelt
• Get joy out of what you do
• Show gratitude to those who helped you become who you are
• Invite inspiration in
• We need community
• Be happy when others are successful
• Find people to push you to be better
• Respect those who paved the path for you to be able to do what you do
• Don't become old and bitter
• Let people enjoy what they enjoy
• Let art evolve
• The way we've always done things is not a good reason to keep doing them that way
• Whatever you do, do it your way
• Get out of your own way
• Manage your attention the way you have to manage oxygen on a spaceship
• If it's not relevant to your life, it's taking up too much room
• Don't focus on things that rob you of energy and time

Here's the full podcast:

Josh: The Podcast, Episode 63: Find that one thing — a conversation with Jeffrey Sass (plus book giveaway!)

Jeff Sass has had an interesting journey, and the jumping point that led him through the rest of his career (so far) was a stint at Troma, a studio that has for 40 years made gloriously bad movies. His book, Everything I Know About Business and Marketing, I Learned from the Toxic Avenger, came out in May.

He's been ahead of the tech curve a few times, including having the Toxic Avenger (a Troma superhero) do an online Q&A in 1994, creating CD-ROMs, getting into virtual reality in the late 1990s, creating an online/SMS price comparison tool in 1999/2000 and getting into the top-level domain space as soon as ICANN opened it up in 2011. He gives us a look at what he thinks is coming next.

He is currently the chief marketing officer for the .CLUB domain.

We talk about the book, including the process and tips for people who might want to write a book; what Jeff thinks is coming down the pike in the tech space; and finding the one thing that makes you love your job, your partner or anything else that you might not be feeling passionate about.

We're also giving away a copy of the book; listen all the way to the end of the podcast to find out how to win.

A couple of corrections/updates: We name the author of Nobody Wants to Read Your Shit Steven Pressman; it's the great Steven Pressfield (whose work is mentioned with some frequency on this podcast). Also, Alphabet (Google's parent) announced it sale of Boston Dynamics after this podcast was recorded.

Show our sponsors some love:
Get a free month with a subscription to BarkBox at GetBarkBox.com/josh
Get 30% off your purchase of a domain, hosting and other website services at TryGoDaddy.com/josh
Get 15% off your first order at GetBombas.com/josh

Links:
Jeff Sass: Book | Website | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Entrepreneur article on negotiation and traveling as a vegan
.CLUB
Cesspool podcast
Changing the pizza: Civility after the Scalise shooting
Nobody Wants to Read Your Shit by Steven Pressfield
James Gunn | "Guardians of the Galaxy"
Troma | TromaNow | YouTube channel
GameTek
"Reading Rainbow"
William Shatner
Myxer
Tim Ferriss
EverythingIKnowAbout.marketing
Demi Lovato | Fan club
WeChat
ToxicAvenger.marketing
Dad-o-Matic
Chris Brogan
"Sgt. Kabukiman, NYPD"
"Curse of the Cannibal Confederates"

Subscribe
iTunes
Player.fm
Google Play
Stitcher
Libsyn (RSS)

See more episodes on the podcasts page.

Support the podcast:
Get a free month when you subscribe to Barkbox
Get 30% off when you register your domain at GoDaddy
Get 15% off your first order at Bombas
Get a free audiobook and a free month at Audible
Shop at Amazon

Reinventing the pizza, not the pizza box: Discourse in the wake of the Scalise shooting

Hop on in here around 55 minutes and give it four minutes or so. Ryan Singer and Johnny Z are discussing how we deal with each other, and right before the 58 minute mark, Singer comes up with this analogy:

"It doesn't matter if the pizza box changes, it's the pizza."

The pizza box, he says, is technology and society and who is president at any given time and what sorts of structures we live in, but we're the pizza.

It doesn't matter how fancy the box is, if the pizza doesn't change, it's still the same old pizza.

Singer's point here is that you can dress us up any way you want. You can make us high tech, you can let us read minds, you can make us invisible with mirrored clothing. Unless the change happens inside, we're still the same ol' same ol'.

The country saying for this is lipstick on a pig. You can dress it up all you want, it's still a pig.

If you're an asshole, you can put on a shirt that says "peace, love and tie dye" and go to yoga class and say "namaste," but you're still an asshole.

It doesn't matter what's going on on the outside.

Last Tuesday, June 13, was a quiet night at work. It might have been the quietest night of the Trump administration. The Calder Cup final wrapped up (that's the AHL championship — minor league hockey), but there was little else of note in any of our markets.

The next morning, we woke up to news that Rep. Steve Scalise and four others had been shot while practicing for the annual Congressional baseball game. Despite once being tied to White Supremacist David Duke — charges stemming from when Scalise thought he was attending a campaign rally that turned a little more sinister — he is generally well-liked by his colleagues in the House, whatever their party affiliation.

Something feels different about this than when Rep. Gabrielle Giffords was shot in early 2011.

In the Giffords shooting, the gunman had shown anti-government leanings, posting about mind control and that kind of things. He was out to get someone in the federal government and an opportunity presented itself with the Giffords rally.

In the Scalise shooting, someone who was politically active in a traditional sense — the gunman had volunteered on the presidential campaign of Sen. Bernie Sanders (Sanders didn't equivocate on his views here) and had left home to be closer to Washington, where he apparently thought he could be more useful as an activist — went looking for Republicans to shoot.

In the Giffords case, the shooter was paranoid and looking for a way out. In the Scalise case, the shooter had tried to take a traditional route and given up.

The problem with dialogue in this country for the most part is we're no longer listening to each other. We're waiting for the other person to stop speaking so that we can start.

I'm generalizing, of course. There's good discussion and reasonable debate happening every day in every city.

It's just rarely on display in public. And never at the federal level.

Reaction since the Scalise shooting has been a little different. Apart from the partisan wrangling over guns — some of course calling for tighter gun control and others saying we should allow Congress to carry weapons — there have been calls for partisan unity that have been muted, where normally these are empty and grandstanded.

"We are united in our shock. We are united in our anguish," Speaker Paul Ryan said. "An attack on one of us is an attack on all of us."

Rep. Richard Neal, a Massachusetts Democrat, warned about a "deterioration in the manner we talk to each other."

Even President Donald Trump, not exactly known for muted responses and calm, non-partisan rhetoric, had only this to say:

This is a good time for a period of reflection for all of us. The seasons are changing. If you're reading this the day it publishes, the solstice is tonight just after midnight Eastern.

Take a couple of days and decide if you're going to spend the rest of your life speaking at — or worse, shouting over — people you disagree with, rather than actually listening to what they're saying and perhaps even taking it to heart, and letting it change your mind if it strikes that chord in you.

It's certainly time for our national pizza to evolve. Is it time for your pizza to change, too?

Some related stuff you might like:
Civility in disagreement
I was on Me & Paranormal You talking Freemasonry

Josh: The Podcast, Episode 62: On compassion and love

We talk about being open to love, having compassion for others and paying attention to others.

Show our sponsors some love:
Get a free month with a subscription to BarkBox at GetBarkBox.com/josh
Get 30% off your purchase of a domain, hosting and other website services at TryGoDaddy.com/josh
Get 15% off your first order at GetBombas.com/josh

Links:
Dalai Lama, Essential Writings
No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy
A Force for Good by Daniel Goleman
Everlast on Joe Rogan's podcast
Be Here Now Network
Rep. Steve Scalise, others shot
Negativity bias
Jeff Sass

Subscribe
iTunes
Player.fm
Google Play
Stitcher
Libsyn (RSS)

See more episodes on the podcasts page.

Support the podcast:
Get a free month when you subscribe to Barkbox
Get 30% off when you register your domain at GoDaddy
Get 15% off your first order at Bombas
Get a free audiobook and a free month at Audible
Shop at Amazon

Customer service quick hit: Ben’s Neighborhood Grill & Tap

Had a crazy busy work week, so please forgive the short post. I think it still has some impact and a good lesson for businesses. And if you're in Savannah, a good burger, too.

There are a lot of high-energy, high-impact posts coming.

I first heard about Ben's about six months before I moved to Savannah. We had plans to move here, had visited a couple of times, and were still formulating a plan.

We were keeping up with things we might enjoy through media, tourism websites, organizations and also things like the Brew/Drink/Run podcast, where I first heard about Ben's when owner Nick Lambros made an appearance on the show.

It slipped my mind for a while when we moved here, but then we moved close to the restaurant, and so we make an effort to go at least monthly.

The first time was when we were scouting the neighborhood. We had a good burger and a reasonable experience.

The next time we went was just a couple of weeks before we were moving, when a hurricane tore through town. When we came back, we went there for lunch on our way into town. It was the middle of the afternoon, so the place wasn't real busy.

Nick came over and introduced himself and welcomed us to the neighborhood. (Aside: Why does Nick own's Ben's? Because it's Ben Franklin on the door — entrepreneur, beer enthusiast and all around awesome guy.)

A little while ago, I decided to treat myself to a delicious burger after a run in the rain. It was right about noon when I got there, and the place was crowded. I pulled up a stool at the bar, greeted Bob (not her real name, but that's what we call her), asked for a beer and a burger, and noticed a couple of guys at the end of the bar from a distributor with new beers to offer Nick to start carrying.

Even in a packed restaurant, Nick came out from helping at the grill to make time for them, even if the time was brief. He was friendly, patient and polite, even though there was one empty table in his restaurant.

Before he made that time for them, he stopped at the bar, shook my hand and said it was good to see me again.

That's the reason why he sees me again (and again).

Lesson for a business: You're never too busy thanks for spending your money here instead of somewhere else.

Lesson for a customer: You're special. Take your business where it's appreciated.

Lesson for a hungry person: Go get yourself a grass-fed burger and a beer at Ben's. If you're going to spend $20 on lunch somewhere, that's the sort of place to do it.

Josh: The Podcast, Episode 61: Balance and being in the world

Nice seeing this in person. Finally got down to @servicebrewing for a tour and tasting #beer

A post shared by Josh Shear (@joshuanshear) on

A short episode today on balance, re-entry and experiencing the journey as life instead of achievement.

Show our sponsors some love:
Get a free month with a subscription to BarkBox at GetBarkBox.com/josh
Get 30% off your purchase of a domain, hosting and other website services at TryGoDaddy.com/josh
Get 15% off your first order at GetBombas.com/josh

Links:
Be Here Now Network
Red Bull TV's "Visions of Greatness" series
Jeff Sass
Mike Dobbs
Reminder Publications
Troma Studios
Service Brewing

Subscribe
iTunes
Player.fm
Google Play
Stitcher
Libsyn (RSS)

See more episodes on the podcasts page.

Support the podcast:
Get a free month when you subscribe to Barkbox
Get 30% off when you register your domain at GoDaddy
Get 15% off your first order at Bombas
Get a free audiobook and a free month at Audible
Shop at Amazon

The Earth will fix itself, with or without us (see also: without us)

I've been kicking around this post for a while, so it's just as well that the president pulled the US out of the Paris Climate Accord last week to give it some salience.

Here is my very brief political take on the move; skip this paragraph if you want to skip the politics. "The only countries to do X are the US, Nicaragua and Syria." If I'm going to join a small group of countries in doing something, I'm not figuring those two are good role models for the US.

The rest of this post is going to be some combination of my observation and hopes, hopefully with some scientific backing.

Glass Beach is a small section of shoreline in an industrial area of 'Ele'ele on the island of Kaua'i. It gets its name from all the glass in the area.

It has for years been used as a dumping ground for things like engine blocks and industrial tools. The salt water is helping reclaim some of the metal into the lava rock along the shore. Here are a couple of photos of what this looks like.

While we were on the island, a few thousand acres were burned in a wildfire that was started by sparks from a pickup truck.

While no structures were threatened, dozens of emergency workers put their lives on the line to make sure the fire only affected dry brush. I'm sure over the coming months and years, new vegetation will grow in its place and before too long, no sign of the fire will remain.

Let's agree that engine blocks, industrial tools and pickup trucks are manmade things that would not otherwise be found in nature, and so we wouldn't have things like fires started by sparks from a pickup truck or engine blocks tossed on lava rocks without some sort of human intervention (objectively speaking — no judgment attached, just the fact that humans need to be involved at some stage of the process to reach this result).

In some amount of time — sooner for the brush fire than for the lava rocks — there will be no sign that anything out of place happened.

The Earth will always find a way to balance whatever happens to it. The thing is, the Earth doesn't care about anything but equilibrium — if a species or two or 16 needs to be eliminated in order to reach a sustainable balance, that's what will happen.

If those species are the star-nosed mole and Pan e Vino figs, the planet doesn't care.

If those species are strawberries and humans, the planet doesn't care.

Keeping the climate habitable for humans isn't something people do for the Earth. It's something they do for people.

Josh: The Podcast, Episode 60: Kaua’i oddities, plus love > fear + anger

Back from Kaua'i with stories of zip lines, small planes and feral chickens, plus the realizations we get from sitting on the beach watching the sun go up and down.

Show our sponsors some love:
Get a free month with a subscription to BarkBox at GetBarkBox.com/josh
Get 30% off your purchase of a domain, hosting and other website services at TryGoDaddy.com/josh
Get 15% off your first order at GetBombas.com/josh

Links:
Astonishing Legends
Gooselove
JKWD Episode 51: Aloha
Inara
Seth Horan's podcast
Wild Kaua'i Chocolate
Josh on Facebook
Pod Save the World with Bill Burns
Rem Dass
Eckhart Tolle
The Dalai Lama
Notes on Abundance by Peter Diamandis and Steven Kotler

Subscribe
iTunes
Player.fm
Google Play
Stitcher
Libsyn (RSS)

See more episodes on the podcasts page.

Support the podcast:
Get a free month when you subscribe to Barkbox
Get 30% off when you register your domain at GoDaddy
Get 15% off your first order at Bombas
Get a free audiobook and a free month at Audible
Shop at Amazon