The Earth will fix itself, with or without us (see also: without us)

I've been kicking around this post for a while, so it's just as well that the president pulled the US out of the Paris Climate Accord last week to give it some salience.

Here is my very brief political take on the move; skip this paragraph if you want to skip the politics. "The only countries to do X are the US, Nicaragua and Syria." If I'm going to join a small group of countries in doing something, I'm not figuring those two are good role models for the US.

The rest of this post is going to be some combination of my observation and hopes, hopefully with some scientific backing.

Glass Beach is a small section of shoreline in an industrial area of 'Ele'ele on the island of Kaua'i. It gets its name from all the glass in the area.

It has for years been used as a dumping ground for things like engine blocks and industrial tools. The salt water is helping reclaim some of the metal into the lava rock along the shore. Here are a couple of photos of what this looks like.

While we were on the island, a few thousand acres were burned in a wildfire that was started by sparks from a pickup truck.

While no structures were threatened, dozens of emergency workers put their lives on the line to make sure the fire only affected dry brush. I'm sure over the coming months and years, new vegetation will grow in its place and before too long, no sign of the fire will remain.

Let's agree that engine blocks, industrial tools and pickup trucks are manmade things that would not otherwise be found in nature, and so we wouldn't have things like fires started by sparks from a pickup truck or engine blocks tossed on lava rocks without some sort of human intervention (objectively speaking — no judgment attached, just the fact that humans need to be involved at some stage of the process to reach this result).

In some amount of time — sooner for the brush fire than for the lava rocks — there will be no sign that anything out of place happened.

The Earth will always find a way to balance whatever happens to it. The thing is, the Earth doesn't care about anything but equilibrium — if a species or two or 16 needs to be eliminated in order to reach a sustainable balance, that's what will happen.

If those species are the star-nosed mole and Pan e Vino figs, the planet doesn't care.

If those species are strawberries and humans, the planet doesn't care.

Keeping the climate habitable for humans isn't something people do for the Earth. It's something they do for people.