More than just information

“If information were the answer," Derek Sivers once told Tim Ferriss, "we’d all be billionaires with perfect abs.”

If you are of a certain age, you remember CDs, and if you were early enough to the internet, you remember that once upon a time, CDBaby was the place for independent musicians to sell their wares.

Sivers created CDBaby, then sold it for a boatload of money, which he largely gave away.

He's read, reviewed and synopsized dozens of books so that you don't have to.

Information, then, is important to him, or he wouldn't have done all that reading.

But there's something more. The information isn't enough. It needs to be mixed with the best of each of us to take form, to become something greater.

Josh: The Podcast, Episode 70: Immortality, nukes and Trump chicken

We have a late-night beer, talk about living forever (or dying in nuclear holocaust — thanks, North Korea!) and give a shoutout to the Trump chicken.

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Links:
What Are the Ethical Consequences of Immortality Technology?
Wild Heaven's beers (including Emergency Drinking Beer
8 questions about North Korea's nuclear capabilities
Ray Kurzweil on immortality
Singularity University | Singularity Hub
Shout out to the Trump chicken!

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Baby steps: The way back to creativity

If you've been listening to the podcast, you know I spend much of July dealing with some creative stumbling blocks. We even did an episode on it over at JKWD.

You'll notice the output didn't stop: A new JKWD every Monday. A new blog post ever Tuesday. A new Josh: The Podcast every Thursday.

Showing up and consistency are a large part of the battle against creative blocks. They're simple, but not easy.

Here we are, getting into August, and I have some thoughts coming back into my brain. It might be a month of short hits, much like Seth Godin posts about weekly (he blogs every day, but every now and then, a post is under 150 words — under 100, even — and brings a sharp jolt.

I'll be looking for more sharp jolts this month, and exceptionality as we move into fall.

Happy Tuesday.

Josh: The Podcast, Episode 69: The Mooch, the muse and showing up

Brief show on showing up if you want to push through the bad times, Anthony Scaramucci's crazy 11 days and a little bit more on health care and compromise.

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Links:

Scaramucci in | Scaramucci baby | Scaramucci divorce | Scaramucci batshit interview | Scaramucci out
Fayetteville Central City Lodge #305

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Be undeniably you


Twinsies!? From left: Vin Diesel, Adam Sandler, Josh Shear.

"Hey, man, you look like Vin Diesel!"

"Hey, thanks! Check this out: I even have the haircut," I replied, lifting up my cap for proof.

I was in a hotel bar, towel over my shoulder, fanny pack around my waist, handing a crumpled $20 bill over the counter for a lager in a plastic cup.

Diesel (real name Mark Sinclair), is listed at just shy of six feet tall and around 225 pounds. He's 60 years old. When I saw a trailer for a recent film of his, I asked, "when did Adam Sandler get so big?" Sandler is also 50 years old. He's listed at 5'9" and about 185 pounds.

I'm 10 years their junior, 5'2" tall (on a good day, I might hit 5'3") and at my heaviest, I tend to weigh in around 165 pounds. I'm not anywhere near Sandler's size, never mind Diesel's.

The guy at the bar who told me I looked like Diesel was working on his second Budweiser, so let's assume he was pretty well with it.

Anyway, it's at least flattering to be taken for a celebrity. Even a celebrity I sometimes mistake for another celebrity.

To be honest, I've seen very few of their movies, combined. Sorry, gentlemen. I respect your art, it's just not for me. But you keep doing you.

And that's what this is about — you being you.


Be you. Be your own original. You look like what you look like — or whom you look like, for that matter — but don't let those comparisons shape the person you are or would like to be.


I was told the evening before I was mistaken for an action movie star that there is a dentist in Milwaukee who could be my twin.

I stood looking contemplatively for a moment at the woman who told me that. I may have stood vacantly for just a moment too long because she apologized for any offense; I told her no, I was just filing that away in case that information became useful someday.

See also: Reasonable doubt.

I had been reading The Godfather at the time.


Again, be you. Be an original. Whether you resemble a famous actor or a bodybuilder or a dentist in Milwaukee, if you're not one of those things, don't try to become them. Don't emulate them.

Be the person you are, or become the person you will become.