Josh: The Podcast, Episode 15: Flag-burning, intellectual property and #FreeMilo

The world feels a little strange this week — I've been immersed in coverage of the Republican National Convention, to the point where it almost seems like everyday life when it's clearly a circus. My work shifts have been strange this week, which means I'm not rested at all; instead I've been trying to regulate my energy with a combination of running and meditation. The air conditioning has been out much of the week, which makes for grumpy Josh on top of the mixed realities.

Links:
• Work-life balance for the perpetually busy: Join my upcoming Circle by filling out this form.
• Full coverage of the Republican National Convention from cleveland.com.
• Was Melania Trump's speech plagiarized from Michelle Obama's?
• Does Meredith McIver really exist? (Appparently)
• Third Eye Blind trolls Republican fans
Ted Cruz didn't endorse Donald Trump
• Protests include flag-burning: Should that be a crime?
• Queen complains about use of their music
• Kelvin and I discuss living your life when the world is full of chaos
#FreeMilo: Banned, but seriously, listen to him; he's a troll (if a funny one).

Bonus material for patrons is about the power of words — specifically, do we make them too powerful?

Don't forget to visit the Patreon page and subscribe at one of these great places:

iTunes
Player.fm
Google Play
Stitcher
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See more episodes on the podcasts page.

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Seth Godin on decommoditizing yourself, dropping your entitlement, and the loss of head starts

I've been working my way through the 30 Days of Genius interviews on CreativeLive, and, surprise, Seth Godin's stood out to me.

If you're not familiar with Seth Godin, please go spend two days watching and reading some of his stuff. This all right here is not important; it's just talking points from this interview.

Godin's altMBA »

Chase Jarvis, photographer and founder of CreativeLive, interviews Godin. Here are some of the points I think are important.

• There is no secret; there is no right answer.
• Genius is an ancient term for the voice in your head. No one's a genius, we all have a genius.
• Fear is hard-wired into us, but sometimes it's just wrong — a presentation at work is nothing like the Spanish Inquisition, even though we have the same reaction to it.
• Most people are talented. If you're doing banal work, you're afraid to use your talent.
• Overwhelm a platform with generosity. If you stay off the ship because you're worried about a wreck, you're still off the ship when it's successful.
• We live in a world right now where we don't need to be picked — by an employer, by a publisher, etc.

Jarvis: I love that your prescriptions are so simple.
Seth: But hard to do.

• Are you just doing something to get more famous? If so, why? If you couldn't see your numbers, would you still do it? For example, are you only trying to grow your Twitter followers because you can see the number of Twitter followers you have?
• We're living in the most crowded creative time ever. You're not entitled to attention or leverage, but you can earn it.
• Build art that doesn't work unless you share it. The first guy who had a fax machine couldn't do anything with it until someone else had a fax machine.
• Anything worth doing is worth doing because you changed someone else. If we don't make a change happen, what did we do? Sharing will happen naturally when you change someone. "The Laramie Project" was a play about gay rights, and you and I have heard of it because it changed the people who saw it and they wanted to share it.
• Our public education system isn't designed to create innovation. It was started by industrialists to grow a workforce with similar education who is trained to sit at a desk all day, and hasn't changed since. We have summers off because we needed time to pick crops.
• [To work around the problems of public education]: Parents need to tell kids that straight A's aren't the point. Ask, "What problem have you solved today?" Kids have to answer that before they're allowed to do their homework.
• If you can't buy into "it might not work," you have to trick yourself into it.
• Have a practice. If you go in for surgery, you want the surgeon to do things the same way every time. Similarly, when it comes to daily practices, there's no one practice that's demonstrably better than another, but having a practice is important.
• Now that the world has changed, don't get frustrated. If you want to be treated like a non-commodity, don't act like a commodity.
• Take responsibility for what you do. It's not your boss's fault, not your parents' fault.
• Don't do great things tomorrow, do them today.

Josh: The Podcast, Episode 14: Here come the conventions!

The time we next speak, it'll be nominating day for Donald Trump at the Republican National Convention, and we'll be just days away from the Democratic National Convention. Do the conventions matter? What's it going to be like in the wake of all the violence the past couple of weeks, particularly in Cleveland — where officers have been involved in a couple of highly-criticized shooting deaths in the past couple of years and with Ohio being an open carry state?

Links:
Cleveland.com's coverage of the Republican National Convention
Cleveland agrees to $6 million settlement in Tamir Rice shooting
Cleveland pays $3 million settlement as police shoot car 137 times after chase
Revisionist History, Episode 5: Food Fight
Josh & Kelvin World Domination podcast
Join my Creative Coast Circle

Bonus material for patrons is about the importance of routines.

Don't forget to visit the Patreon page and subscribe at one of these great places:

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Player.fm
Google Play
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See more episodes on the podcasts page.

Support the podcast:
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About a book: The Sex Lives of Siamese Twins by Irvine Welsh

I love me some Irvine Welsh. You probably know him as the author of Trainspotting. A foul-mouthed, sex-drugs-and-fucking Brit who sometimes allows his characters to get away with murder.

Which he does in The Sex Lives of Siamese Twins.

The book is something a bit different for Welsh. Set in Miami and focused on hard-ass personal trainer Lucy Brennan and her Pygmalion, Lena Sorenson.

The novel opens with Brennan angrily leaving the home of her annoying boyfriend in the wee hours. She stops a shooting, and Sorenson gets cell phone video of the event.

Things balloon from there.

We see the building of celebrity, and the tearing down of it. We see emotional abusive relationships. Kidnappings. Art. Exercise. Murder.

Meanwhile, the nation is absorbed in the story of a pair of 16-year-old conjoined twins from Arkansas. One wants to have sex with her boyfriend; the other hates him.

Do they get the surgery to separate them, even though the odds of survival for one of them is slim?

Find out. Really, read this. Lots of fun, and a great summer read.

Josh: The Podcast, Episode 13: Declaring independence

flag

When, in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one person to look around at the landscape of today's world and do his best to keep his head from exploding, maybe it's time to just remember where we came from in the week after Independence Day and read the Declaration of Independence.

Happy podcast day.

Links:
Full text: U.S. Declaration of Independence
Remembering Elie Wiesel

Bonus material for patrons is we'll actually talk about the ridiculousness that was this week in the presidential race.

Don't forget to visit the Patreon page and subscribe at one of these great places:

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Player.fm
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See more episodes on the podcasts page.

Support the podcast:
Patreon
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Reminder: Own your job, and you’re entitled to work hard


"Hard work is just preparation for a lucky day," Sir Mix-a-Lot tells Chase Jarvis

I was supposed to be unemployed today.

Long story, but I went over it in the bonus material of Episode 11 of the podcast (bonus material available with a donation at Patreon).

Short version: I had the opportunity to mail it in, but I didn't. I remembered something I wrote some 4.5 years ago. Someone was paying me money, and they deserved my best.

I'm going to leave this bit right here about how you're entitled to work hard, but not to much else in this life. Deal with it.

Josh: The Podcast, Episode 12: Hello, Birmingham. Plus: Kids shooting kids (again)

I spent a couple of quick days in Birmingham over the past week, and I came back to a 10-year-old accidentally shooting his 8-year-old cousin. You know how I feel about this, right? And then a 5-year-old in New Jersey shot a 4-year-old with his mom's gun. Sigh.

Links to stuff I talk about:
10-year-old shoots 8-year-old, parents say, "They know better"
5-year-old boy playing with mom's gun shoots, kills 4-year-old brother
Trim Tab Brewing Co.
Urban Standard
Octane
Holler & Dash
Saw's
Forsyth Farmers Market
Prankster gets USA Today to print Cormac McCarthy death
Tamir Rice shooting in Cleveland
Cleveland suspends 63 officers in chase that ended in deaths of two unarmed people (nope, 63 is not a typo)

Bonus material for patrons is about doing some research and having good discussions.

In the bonus material for Episode 10, I asked Lewis Howes' question about three truths you know. Listener sent his three. I think they're worth sharing.

• When in doubt or despair there is always a way to fight or push through — never give up.
• There is no magic pill — there may be many different roads but every journey will require hustle and hard work.
• Don't get stuck on money is everything. Yes you need to support yourself and your family and determine where you are comfortable but more importantly, you should do something you love every day. As unrealistic as it sometimes sounds, it can be done. Find joy in your daily life.

You can leave yours in comments here or email them from the About page.

Don't forget to visit the Patreon page and subscribe at one of these great places:

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Player.fm
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See more episodes on the podcasts page.

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The ongoing fear of success

I was pretty smart four years ago when I asked, "how do you plan for success?"

I'm dumber now, I guess, because I just read that piece and learned something from it.

Maybe I'm not dumber. Maybe I just needed a reminder. Clearly I haven't spent the four years learning the entire lesson.

I was reminded of problem of fearing success when Joey Diaz had Matt Baker on his podcast last week.

Diaz, the actor and comedian, and Baker, a second-degree black belt in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, are on the mic with producer Lee Syatt. They're talking about Diaz getting into comedy, and about his fear of getting onstage.

Scroll ahead to 34:19 if you want to hear this exchange; go before that if you want context.

Syatt: Were you worried you were going to bomb? Is that what you were most worried about? Or were you worried that you were going to do well?

Diaz: I was worried I was going to find the answer to all my problems.

"I was worried I was going to find the answer to all my problems."

What are you not doing because you're worried it will eliminate your ability to complain about anything?

Josh: The Podcast, Episode 11: Halfway to

A shorter podcast than usual today, as I'm heading out of town. Subject matter is a little lighter, too. I hope you'll enjoy this respite.

Links to stuff I talk about:
2016 running goal: Halfway home
Allow your plan to change
• I reserve the right to change. Listen to the JKWD episode, and read a post it inspired about the Special Libraries Association.

Bonus material for patrons is about being amazing at it while it's yours.

Don't forget to visit the Patreon page and subscribe at one of these great places:

iTunes
Player.fm
Google Play
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See more episodes on the podcasts page.

Support the podcast:
Patreon
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Running 2016: Halfway home

A 2-fer on Saturday took me halfway to my 2016 running goal. 500 miles down, 500 miles to go.

The calendar said I was 13 days ahead of schedule — we were 170 days into the year with 196 left. Yeah, I know. I picked a leap year. If I reach my goal on Dec. 31, we'll put an asterisk on it.

It's not a given, obviously, that I'll get there. We hit triple digits on Friday for the first time, and it's only June. That means we've got probably another 10-12 weeks of weather that will stay too hot for me to run more than 18-20 miles a week without really feeling it. I still need to put an injury buffer in, just in case. I need to figure in time for a vacation (even though I'll probably get a couple of runs in during it).

Me on Runkeeper »

But I feel good, generally. I started running only in the past few years, and distances only in the past 13 months. It's very much a meditation for me now. It used to take me 75-80 minutes to get into a meditative rhythm. Now I can slide in after a few minutes. It's stress relief, it's escape, and it gives me a good time to just think.

Anyway, here's an old favorite. Enjoy.