First half marathon diary, Week 7

Happy Monday, friends!

Phew. A little later than usual today, but you know how sometimes life happens while we make plans. As expected, did a little less distance and a little less time on the road than last week, since the recovery run is supposed to taper and no 5K this week. So...

I seem to pace my short runs well; my recovery run wound up at 2.38 miles, with the first two splits at 11:08 each and the last bit a little faster (mostly I just wanted to get home). My long run for the week, however (6.2 miles), featured an 8:58 third mile and a 12:32 fourth mile. I know that a lot of that was most of my third mile was done on even concrete while the rest featured uneven brick, curbs and the like. Since my goal is "finish," maybe I don't need to worry about pacing at all, so long as I can keep going.

This coming week, things change up to five runs instead of four, with one medium distance instead of two, and three short distances instead of one. Anyway. Onward for the rest of the day.

Links

Me on Runkeeper
More running diary
Rock 'n' Roll Savannah
Training schedule

Stats

Miles logged last week: 18.69
Time logged last week: 3:27:23
Weeks until race: 16
Weight: 164

Sweaty Josh picture of the week

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Control your next step: Move forward


You know, this doesn't only apply to running. This is really about getting out of bed and pushing through every day, whatever your challenges are.

Some of you know I'm training for a half marathon in November. I get it. Thousands of people do these every year — maybe it's hundreds of thousands. I have a friend who, after suffering a foot injury in 2014, is looking to complete 15 of them this year. To qualify for the competition division in the Boston Marathon, people need to run a full marathon faster than my projected half marathon time. For many people, a half marathon is no big deal.

But it turns out it kind of is. It's a giant mental challenge. I'm not even to half that distance yet, and I'm already running more hours in a week than I typically drive. You know what else is a giant mental challenge? Life.

Tuesdays are my first run of the week, and a week ago Tuesday, I had five miles on my calendar. I really had to push, especially the last three-quarters of a mile or so. I felt good about getting past the temptation to walk for a bit, but in general I was giving myself a mental beating about it. I had other things to do, though, and I knew I'd need some of that brain power for the evening, so I let it go.

The next day, Wednesday, is typically a day off, but I'd already decided to change up my schedule for the week, so I went back out for another five-mile run. Two and a half miles in, I was feeling good, and I came to the realization that it didn't matter what yesterday's run felt like. It didn't even matter what the first mile of today's run felt like, or even the last step. Once the step had been taken, it was done. I couldn't take it again. I could only worry about the next step, and then the next one after that. I couldn't even worry about what happened in ten steps — I had nine steps to go before then, and I had to take each one of those as they came.

It wound up being a great run.

By that point in the week, the podcasts I typically listen to had started to pile up for the week. And they were all about pulling yourself together and doing what's next and not making a big deal out of what you just did. Almost all of them, in fact.

For your listening pleasure (no, really, this all converged in the same week; thanks, universe, for giving me an idea then clobbering me over the head with it a few times):

Seth Godin tells Brian Koppelman it's easier, sometimes, to keep failing, to not take the steps required for success because if you do succeed, then you'll have to deal with that success. Example: Do you have a manuscript under your arm? Go ahead, don't submit it for publication. You can keep having the excuse that you can't get it published.

Joe Rogan had Jon Ronson on, discussing some of Ronson's old documentaries, which really required him to do some crazy stuff, like infiltrate "secret societies" (I tend to prefer "societies with secrets" as a term, I guess), and his new book about public shaming. Realize, though, that to be publicly shamed, you have to have really taken a bold step in public.

Tim Ferriss talked to Ret. Gen. Stan McChrystal and his former aide-de-camp Chris Fussell about the mental toughness required to be a great leader. They also touch on the difference between impressing authority and impressing your peers — McChrystal found himself in considerable amounts of trouble at West Point (where for punishment they basically make you pace to waste time you don't have), but he always got really high peer reviews, and he turned out to be a great military leader and a successful entrepreneur.

Marc Maron spoke to transwoman Laura Jane Grace, who fronts the punk band Against Me!, about dealing with her identity, transitioning from a man to a woman while maintaining the same role in the same band, and what it means to "sell out" — that is, dealing with your success vs. changing to become successful.

Duncan Trussell talks to Marc Maron about what it was like to talk to a sitting president in his garage. Maron's garage, not the president's. And Maron's response is basically that it was exciting, but he woke up the next morning and still went back to work.

Robert Johnson talked to Joseph James about making movies, specifically the start of creating the second film of a planned "The Freemason" trilogy. It doesn't matter what the trilogy is about, though. The first film had a very limited release and made most of its money on screenings, but James is hoping for a wider release for the second film, including getting it into theaters. The discussion is really about following the calling to create, and what it takes to make that happen.

So, what's your next step? I'm not sure what mine is yet, but I know not only that I can control it, but that it's all I can control.

First half marathon diary, Week 6

Happy Monday, friends!

Really good week this week. In four runs, I had two road distance PRs (one of them was also farther than I've done on the treadmill) and three duration PRs. I finished out the week with a 5K for a recovery run. I'll go a little less distance this week, since the recovery runs taper down. It was nice mixing up the running days a little. I might mess around with my lifting routine this coming week, try some bodyweight work and such, just to mix it up there while I get back to Tuesday-Thursday-Saturday runs, before I go up to five runs per week the following week.

Links

Summer Sizzler 5K
Me on Runkeeper
More running diary
Rock 'n' Roll Savannah
Training schedule

Stats

Miles logged last week: 19.47
Time logged last week: 3:40:33
Weeks until race: 17
Weight: 165

Sweaty Josh picture of the week

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This week in political correctness (or is it?): Trump, Schumer, Mexicans, the Confederate flag and the Washington Redskins

Wow, it's an interesting week in political correctness, or whatever we're calling it these days.

Let's see. Should we start with the Confederate flag, Mexicans or the Washington Redskins? Hmm. Maybe Mexicans.

You may have heard that the Miss USA Pageant had to set up streaming video on its own website after being dropped by Univision and NBC (and later picked up by Reelz) after pageant owner Donald Trump called Mexicans "rapists." You know who else called Mexicans "rapists" (or insinuated that they are)? Comedian Amy Schumer. A couple of WaPo columnists are saying she should be Donald Trump's running mate.

Really, what I think they're saying, is that Schumer has a new movie out and a show on Comedy Central and maybe you should put up a boycott. Uh...here's the thing. Schumer is a comedian. She's trying to get a laugh. If she tries a joke and it doesn't work, she won't use it anymore. If people find her funny, she'll keep saying it, even if she doesn't believe it.

Donald Trump is trying to be president of the United States. You know, the guy who helps make laws and is expected to be able to talk to other world leaders about international policy.

Nobody really thinks Tom Segura wants to gain 800 pounds or that Louis CK thinks it's ridiculous that people have Chinese babies or Daniel Tosh this his his sister getting raped is a good practical joke. Know why? They're comedians. Donald Trump? Not a comedian. If Trump's elected, the president of Mexico can skip the Amy Schumer movie but is stuck sharing a border with a guy who said publicly he's probably a criminal.

On to the Confederate flag.

The biggest debate right now, of course, is the Confederate flag flying at the South Carolina Capitol. It's been there since South Carolina joined the Confederacy integration movements in the 1960s. It represents racism to some people, states' rights to other people, and a whole bunch of other stuff to other folks.

The question facing the government is, should it come down? The state Senate said yes it should, and the House debated for 11 hours before agreeing.

Of course it should come down BUT here's why. It represents nothing more than a rooting interest, and it's at a government building. The U.S. flag is a symbol of the United States. The South Carolina state flag is a symbol of South Carolina. The Confederate flag is a symbol of a union of states that hasn't existed in 150 years, and now represents a variety of things to a variety of people.

They might as well put up a Gamecocks banner and wait for the Tigers fans to lose it.

Ever since the Charleston church shooting, the Confederate flag debate has also seeped into popular culture. Golfer Bubba Watson said he'll remove the Confederate flag from atop his "General Lee" (the car from "Dukes of Hazzard," a show TV Land pulled).

Some are really angry about that. They say TV Land and Bubba Watson are bowing to popular pressure; they're "selling out." Of course they are! You know what happens to television stations when people stop watching? They go off the air. Know what happens when people won't buy tickets to PGA events because one of the athletes is doing something to bother them? The PGA takes away his livelihood. Of course they'll bow to popular pressure. That's how they stay popular, because that's how definitions work.

On almost a side note, some NASCAR fans in Daytona were flying the Confederate flag — sometimes above the U.S. flag. Now, I get the flying of the Confederate flag, but above the U.S. flag? That's at the very least disrespectful (and a violation of U.S. flag code); it might actually be treasonous. As in, actionably so. As in, your choice of what you fly on top of your camper could get you drawn and quartered.

More: Minnesota firefighter suspended for flying Confederate flag on fire truck »

Another thing that happened this week is a judge said the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office was right to cancel the trademark of the NFL's Washington Redskins. The trademark was canceled last year, though the team can keep the trademark until it completes the appeals process.

Under section 37 C.F.R. 1.211, Publication of applications, of the trademark code, subsection (d):

The Office may refuse to publish an application, or to include a portion of an application in the patent application publication (§ 1.215), if publication of the application or portion thereof would violate Federal or state law, or if the application or portion thereof contains offensive or disparaging material.

Essentially, under the determination that the term "Redskins" is offensive, the team can't hold a trademark on the name. That's not to say the team name has to change, but if they lose the trademark, they lose that big money on licensing. You or I or anyone else could start making Washington Redskins shirts or hats or bumper stickers or dog collars without paying the team for the use of the name. That's a huge business in sports.

That one's the most interesting to me, I think, because there's no precedent for it, it deals with a privately held business (even if the business is WAY in the public eye) and the outcome is going to swing millions of dollars in one direction or another and affect owners, employees and patrons all differently.

First half marathon diary, Week 5

Happy Monday, friends!

Baby steps, baby steps! I carried over Brother JH's advice from last week to good success. I ate like crap most of the week, and that's my next baby step: cleaning up the diet. Saturday, I finally did clean it up, and Sunday's recovery run was a PR for three miles on the road (3.05 mi in 29:00). I've done faster on the treadmill, but that's a lot different.

This week I start setting distance PRs every other week, and this week I'm changing things up a little by condensing the schedule. The schedule would have me running 5 miles on Tuesday and Thursday, 6 miles for my long run on Saturday, and a 2-3-mile recovery run on Sunday.

To get a little more race-day feeling in me, though, I signed up for a 5K on Saturday. Since that's about the distance of my recovery run, I'll move things up and switch around my days off, taking my 5-milers on Tuesday and Wednesday, my 6-miler on Friday, and then the 5K as a recovery run on Saturday.

My mileage was down this week, primarily because I stayed off the treadmill and stayed on the road. My time on the road was also down, primarily because my speed and endurance are up.

Links

SaltStick PLUS Capsules
Summer Sizzler 5K
Me on Runkeeper
More running diary
Rock 'n' Roll Savannah
Training schedule

Stats

Miles logged last week: 16.1
Time logged last week: 2:53:15
Weeks until race: 18
Weight: 166

Sweaty Josh picture of the week

2015-07-05 13.23.20

The president is doing podcasts; what does the future hold for the medium?

You probably heard that President Barack Obama appeared on comedian Marc Maron's podcast, WTF, about a week and a half ago (photos). It wasn't the first time he's done a podcast — he was on the B.S. Report way back in March 2012 — but you most likely heard about this one, since he said the word "nigger" (in the context of "it's not OK to call someone a 'nigger'" — he wasn't just dropping an N-bomb casually) and mainstream media freaked the fuck out.

After you've listened to that episode, take some time to listen to Maron talk to his producer, Brendan McDonald, about setting this up. Maron had been scheduled to be on vacation, so that was rescheduled, so McDonald dealt with Secret Service and such leading up to the interview.

Maron has one of the most popular podcasts on the planet. His 2010 reconciliation with comedian Louis CK was selected as the best podcast ever recorded. He's interviewed Terry Gross, Robin Williams, Mick Jagger and over 600 other people. For most of the people who aren't scared of disruptive technology and formats, Maron is old guard in a new world.

But still, this wasn't like doing Bill Simmons' podcast with ESPN (a Disney subsidiary) backing it. That's still old media, just in a new format. For his WTF appearance, the president parked his helicopter at the Hollywood Bowl, climbed into a car and went to go talk to a comedian in his garage.

If podcasting hadn't already arrived, it has now. And it's only going to get stronger.

First half marathon diary, Week 4

Happy Monday, friends!

Little crisis of faith this week, 2.5 miles into a four-mile run on Tuesday, so I hit the treadmill on Thursday and then had a good chat with Brother JH that evening. He gave me some advice that was good for Saturday and Sunday, so hopefully that'll carry through. More in the video, and hopefully even more next week.

Links

Me on Runkeeper
More running diary
Rock 'n' Roll Savannah
Training schedule

Stats

Miles logged last week: 17.72 (5.72 treadmill)
Time logged last week: 3:10:26 (46:40 treadmill)
Weeks until race: 19
Weight: 165

Sweaty Josh picture of the week

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Date night Savannah: Bar Food, CO, river, Bohemian and Leopold’s

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We set out for a networking event last week, and found it was canceled. Woo! A reason to go out and try new places!

2015-06-18 18.00.06We'd been meaning to get to Bar Food for a while, but it's in a part of town we don't go to a lot, but it was right around the corner from our canceled event, so we went, had a beer and a snack. They have a solid selection of craft brews and the other usuals. I had a Two Boots, while Jenny had a cider. We shared a cheese board, which came with some toast, four cheeses, local honey, some pickles and strawberries. Great way to start the evening. The menu looked really good; the crowd was interesting — it's a contemporary, kind of hipster place, but the crowd leaned not exactly biker, but not exactly not biker.

We then headed downtown to another place that was on my list, CO, which recently opened in Savannah after having restaurants in Charleston and Myrtle Beach. Our server, Grace, soft-sold us some cucumber mojitos, which were light and refreshing on a 103-degree day. We had summer rolls and gyoza (pork dumplings) as appetizers — both delicious — and Jenny ordered some pad thai while I had a tiger roll, which their menu describes as "shrimp, surimi salad, cucumber, yamagobo, avocado, unagi sauce, spicy aioli." We were both very pleased with the meals, and with the overall atmosphere. We sat at the sushi bar, but there's also a bar in the front, some booths in the back, a couple of high tops and some long tables should you decide you might want to meet a couple of people. The electronic dance music was quiet and suited the space well. We'll be back, though we're worried this will become a hot spot and we won't be able to get a seat next time.

A photo posted by Josh Shear (@joshuanshear) on

Left, from top: Pork gyoza, cucumber mojito, summer roll. Right, from top: Pad thai with chicken and shrimp, tiger roll

With quite full bellies, we wandered on down to the river to sit for a bit. If you're ever wondering why we might have moved here, it's because we can park, walk and have this view about 330 nights a year.

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We finally decided after almost an hour to get up and visit a bar we'd gone to once and found it too crowded (at 10:00 on a Friday night). Rocks on the Roof at the Bohemian Hotel. The rooftop is open on two sides, one overlooking the Savannah River, and one overlooking the crowds on Bay Street and Founders Walk. We sat on the river side on a sofa and sipped a gin and tonic, and met a recently engaged couple. The electronic dance music seemed a little loud out of place for a space that's reminiscent of more of a jazz cocktail lounge, but it's still a cool spot.

Cute, happy and on a rooftop. #visitsavannah #savannah #datenight

A photo posted by Josh Shear (@joshuanshear) on

2015-06-18 21.47.03-1Our last stop for the night was, of course, at Leopold's. If you're new to the area or just visiting and the line out the door has turned you off, don't sweat it. The bend in the line at the curb is about a seven-minute wait, the ice cream is homemade and the soda fountain is basically the same as it was in 1930-whatever. I love the butter pecan ice cream, but pictured here is a dish of chocolate chewies and cream and a hot fudge sundae, which are both also delicious. They even have seasonal flavors; the Japanese cherry blossom is light and creamy and wonderful.

And apparently they also make good soups and such, but for now, we're happy working our way through the ice cream menu.

Where should we go next, Savannah?

First half marathon diary, Week 3

Happy Monday, friends!

It was a really hot week, so we did a couple of runs on the treadmill, but we went longer than scheduled to make up for the softer landing. Biggest traps at this point are diet and sleep.

Links

Me on Runkeeper
More running diary
Rock 'n' Roll Savannah
Training schedule

Stats

Miles logged last week: 14.36 (7.56 treadmill)
Time logged last week: 2:29:05 (1:04:51 treadmill)
Weeks until race: 20
Weight: 167

Sweaty Josh picture of the week

2015-06-20 11.33.24

Mind dump: Charleston church shooting

"They're already using the nuanced language of lack of effort," Jon Stewart said on a night when he had no jokes for his opening monologue.

The shooting Wednesday night at Emanuel AME in Charleston was different from the bigger racially-tinged violence we've had this past year. On Staten Island and in Ferguson, white police officers were responsible for the deaths of black men on the street. In Baltimore, it was again white police officers responsible for the death of a black man, this time in custody. These turned into citizens vs. authority figures.

Charleston was different: A young white man walked into a black church and killed nine black people who were at Bible study.

As some of you know, I work in news. The story unfolded very slowly for us. The shooting took place around 9:30 p.m. For a long time, all the news we knew came from the Charleston Police Department's Twitter feed.

My parents live in Charleston, and, in fact, my father had finished up giving a tour and left downtown right as the shooting happened. I got a text from my mother, who said their internet and cable went down right around 9:30. Interesting.

We first got a paragraph of news from the ground at about 11:15 p.m. That's a surprisingly long time. Over the next hour and a half, we got bits and pieces of information. You can see our first story, which incorporates that trickle, is clearly a cobbled together mishmash of information. By about 1 a.m., there were confirmed deaths, and when we finished about 3 a.m., this is what we knew. So, not much.

Looking back only 36 hours after the shooting, things came about very quickly. The suspect was arrested, the governor is calling for the death penalty and the mourning can start in earnest without the manhunt. Now there are some things that are definitely worth talking about.

The sanctity of church. The victims of this shooting were gathered in a place of prayer, comfort and safety. I don't understand the underlying feeling that compels someone to shoot people, but I have to think that, beyond whatever racial hatred is at play here, it takes a little something different to walk into a church to shoot people. Apparently, Emanuel AME has seen this kind of thing before. It surprises me that in a Bible Belt town, a house of worship isn't sacred.

The Charleston paper didn't pull a gun ad.

I get that there are perfectly legal reasons to own guns. I definitely respect the right to hunt, and I understand that by getting my meat at the grocery store I'm just asking someone else to kill an animal for me. But also note that the suspect arrested in this case, Dylann Roof, owned his gun legally. By and large, guns used in crimes are obtained illegally.

But let's look beyond gun control for a moment. A newspaper is historically the conscience of its community, and The Post and Courier is a really good paper. But I think placing an ad right on top of a major shooting story is something I hope took a lot of discussion when they were getting ready to distribute. Sometimes it's worth saying, "Sorry, we had to pull the ad."

The confederate flag is the only one at full staff over the state capitol. Far be it from me to tell you how to show your state's colors. But. The U.S. flag and South Carolina state flag were being flown at half staff at S.C. government buildings, but the confederate flag is at full staff. The flag is a point of pride for some, and a point of hatred for others. State officials decided at one point over the past few years it should remain at the capitol. Go ahead, remember it as a symbol of states' rights. But admit that it means something else entirely to a lot of people. To many, it's a symbol of oppression. This might be the right time to take it down entirely, but at least have the respect to fly it at half staff with the others.

#WeWillShootBack. This is among the more difficult things we're going to have to deal with as a nation. While up until this point, the unifying cry has been #BlackLivesMatter, the conversation on Twitter has shifted from a position of resistance to a position of revenge. With that necessarily comes a responsibility for all to be vigilant, and to not take on an act of pure revenge — that is, walk into a church and shoot a bunch of innocent white worshippers. That would be an identical act of hatred.

What are your initial thoughts?

More discussion: Parsing Ferguson »